The “Sinner’s Prayer” is a superstition

Advertisements

More from T4G…

As I mentioned yesterday, the annual Together for the Gospel conference is going on right now at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY.

David Platt, pastor of the Church at Brook Hills in Birmingham, AL, preached a sermon entitled Divine Sovereignty: The Fuel of Death-Defying Missions. It is an hour long. I promise you it will not seem like it. You will want more. You will be challenged (even ashamed) about your involvement in reaching the world with the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Listen to it…

…then go.

Today at T4G…

The annual Together for the Gospel conference is going on right now at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, KY. I was not able to attend, but some friends of mine are there. They keep tweeting to Facebook small snippets from some of the sermons they’ve heard…

“Churches are full of sinners, but congregations are to be filled with born again repenting sinners.”

“False Converts hire false teachers. There is a symbiotic relationship between false converts and false teachers.”

As far as I can tell, those two quotes came from Mark Dever, pastor of Capital Hill Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Apparently they are from his sermon entitled, “False Conversions: The Suicide of the Church.” This is a lesson I have been learning quite well for a few years, now.

Jesus Really Died!

The Father’s Bargain

John Flavel, an English minister during the Puritan era, once speculated about a verbal exchange between God the Father and God the Son. In this exchange, the Father was considering the hopeless plight of fallen man — how they were open to His wrath. The Son offers an alternative to the Father.

This exchange is known as “The Father’s Bargain.”

Father: My son, here is a company of poor miserable souls, that have utterly undone themselves, and now lie open to my justice! Justice demands satisfaction for them, or will satisfy itself in the eternal ruin of them: What shall be done for these souls and thus Christ returns.

Son: O my Father, such is my love to, and pity for them, that rather than they shall perish eternally, I will be responsible for them as their Surety; bring in all thy bills, that I may see what they owe thee…

We need to pause right there and recognize one fact — we could never, ever pay God what we owe. That is why hell is forever. Our debt could never be paid if it were demanded of us. Let’s continue…

Son (continued): Lord, bring them all in, that there may be no after-reckonings with them; at my hand shalt thou require it. I would rather choose to suffer thy wrath than they should suffer it: upon me, my Father, upon me be all their debt.

Father: But, my Son, if thou undertake for them, thou must reckon to pay the last mite, expect no abatements…

Please take careful note of the next thing the Father says…

…if I spare them, I will not spare thee.

Brethren, for us to be spared Christ had to suffer ALL of the wrath due us. We can’t overlook this — we are blessed because HE was cursed.

Son: Content, Father, let it be so; charge it all upon me, I am able to discharge it…

Also realize that Christ is the ONLY one who could make such a statement. He is the only one able to discharge our debt.

Son (continued): And though it prove a kind of undoing to me, though it impoverish all my riches, empty all my treasures, (for so indeed it did, 2 Cor. 8:9, “Though he was rich, yet for our sakes he became poor”) yet I am content to undertake it.

The content of this exchange in the heavenly realms should drive us to the floor, prostrate before God and His Christ in awe.

John Flavel concluded “The Father’s Bargain” with this word to Christians…

Blush, ungrateful believers, O let shame cover your faces; judge in yourselves now, has Christ deserved that you should stand with him for trifles, that you should shrink at a few petty difficulties, and complain, this is hard, and that is harsh? O if you knew the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ in  this wonderful condescension for you, you could not do it.

Sunday we will celebrate the resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ. Before we do, however, we would do well to spend some time considering what it was that put Him in the grave in the first place.

%d bloggers like this: